From the Director

Dear Friends, 

What a time we live in!

Reeves-Reed Arboretum has slowly come back to life after the majestic and terrifying storms of the recent weeks. We've suffered the loss of many trees along the perimeter of the property and woodland trails, and damage to our deer fence has made our historic gardens vulnerable to grazing and defoliation. And although we suffered relatively minor damage to our structural property, the loss of power, heat, and computer access has put a temporary delay in our ability to function and fully serve our community.

But the loss here is minor to the profound devastation so many of our tri-state neighbors have suffered. Hurricane Sandy has taught us that no one is immune, and therefore alone, from the powerful and lasting effects of nature. Both in good times and in bad, nature rules -she is a great equalizer and we are her subjects. As Shakespeare wrote, "One touch of nature and the whole world is kin."

It is my hope that one lesson we can all take from the many days of struggle and clean-up, as well as the days of sacrifice ahead, is that we each bear the responsibility of our neighbors. In a lovely community such as Summit, or in Manhattan where I live, we must remember to open up our windows and doors, and especially our hearts, to those around us, to offer assistance or even just encouragement. A wave and nod hello from a stranger does wonders when one is feeling cut off or beaten down.

We here at Reeves-Reed want to thank all of you who have offered us support during the storm, and a special thanks to the crews of utility workers and City of Summit employees who have done Yeoman duty to bring Summit back to life.

Patience is the pace of nature, and your friends at Reeves-Reed patiently await the joys of the coming months when we will once again share with you all the pleasures and the exquisite beauty of our magnificent grounds.

See you in the garden - soon.

Frank